Verb Agreement Game

  • Aprile 14, 2021

Use a singular verb with distances, periods, etc. if they are considered a unit. One of the most common problems I find in my letter is that they have ignored agreement on the subject. When I give them correction checklists, that`s often the first thing I point out, and I put them in orbit around each case in which it happens. Choose whether you practice verb subject chord by navigating an insidious galaxy with green monsters, a sea filled with pirates or a river filled with crocodiles. One way or another, it will strike your heart. Suddenly, the practice of English grammar is no longer boring with these games. The time that will be taken into account by building better sentences with our students will never be wasted time! And of course, a lot of that is the subject/verb agreement. The game is very amazing.

It is a set of innovations. Kudos! Even advanced students can struggle with the nuances of this, especially if the subject and verb are not side by side in the sentence. Want to learn more about this ESL writing activity? Look at it here: Correction activity. The way it works is that you write some appropriate themes and verbs on separate maps. Example: You can use image input as some kind of test at the end of your class on the subject/verb setting. The way it works is that you will find an image with a lot of people doing things. Next, students must rely on a number of sentences in their notebooks. In my opinion, tab cards are among the most underutilized activities of the ESL. The way it works with the subject and verb chord is that you can show each student a tab. Or any student can choose from a pile discovered in the middle of the room. If a subject is singular and a subject is plural in one or one or, or, either by a sentence, the verb agrees with the name or pronoun that is closest to it.

Use this simple warm-up activity to check the reference and verb chords at the beginning of the teaching. Or as a quick test at the end. The way it works is that you write a series of sentences on the whiteboard or PowerPoint.